Born to Be Bad (1950)

Christabel fools everyone with her sweet exterior including her cousin Donna and Donna’s wealthy fiancée Curtis. The only one who sees through her facade is Nick, a rugged writer who loves her anyway. Christabel also loves Nick, but she loves Curtis’ money more. After convincing Curtis that Donna is only interested in him for his money, she tricks Curtis into marrying her. Of course, she still dallies with Nick on the side.

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Citizen Hughes

20 July 2006 | by aimless-46 (Kentucky) – See all my reviews

Director Nicholas Ray managed to take his revenge on RKO’s Howard Hughes with this real life “Citizen Kane”. Hughes was obsessively pursuing Joan Fontaine whose post WWII career was going nowhere. Like Hearst’s intervention in Marion Davies’ career, Hughes got Fontaine the lead in Ray’s “Born To Be Bad” and then meddled in the production to insure that the film became a promotional vehicle for her.

Whatever Ray may have thought of this it was not a complete disaster. Although the 32 year- old Fontaine is not credible in the role of a young business school student, if you suspend disbelief about the age factor, her performance is the equal of Anne Baxter’s in “All About Eve”. The same thing could be said of Davies; while her career was mismanaged by Hearst’s inappropriate casting, her talent was still able to shine through.

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Although not given final cut, Ray somehow was able to turn “Born To Be Bad” into a self- parodying melodrama that reflected much of the Hughes-Fontaine relationship. Even making Fontaine’s mark (wealthy Curtis Carey-played by Zachary Scott) into a Hughes look- alike, complete with pencil mustache and a passion for flying.

Unlike Orsen Welles, Ray made a lot of women’s pictures, a quality “Citizen Kane” does not share with “Born To Be Bad”. Fontaine plays master manipulator Christabel Caine (not Kane), not quite a sociopath but a woman with little sign of a conscience. Unlike most of these women’s pictures, it is the men who she has trouble fooling with her innocent act. Cunning gay artist Gobby (Mel Ferrer)) finds her a kindred spirit and novelist Nick (Robert Ryan) is turned on by her greed and lack of moral/ethical boundaries.

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Ray has Fontaine play the character in a nice self-parodying style that actually makes her somewhat sympathetic to the viewer, at least for those who can take a guilty pleasure watching her turn on the charm. Unlike her sister, the eternally earthy Olivia deHavilland, age made Fontaine brittle and well suited to villainess roles. With cute little smiles and feigned reaction shots Fontaine keeps the film vicious for its entire length.

Like Ray’s “Johnny Guitar”, this is a film about two women, one good and one bad (there is no subtlety), who vie for the same man. It is a battle of Joans, as Donna is played by gorgeous Joan Leslie (“Sgt. York”). Donna is a publishing house editor, postwar America was still adjusting to the vocational progress women had made during the war. But the evil Christabel explicitly rejects career opportunities (one can’t imagine her contributing to the war effort) in favor of setting herself up for life by landing a rich husband she can set up for a lucrative divorce settlement.

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Leslie and Ferrer are especially good in the film. Leslie gives the only restrained performance, which is more powerful because it contrasts so sharply with the overplayed performances Ray gets from the rest of his cast.

Then again, what do I know? I’m only a child.

Another RKO Gem

Author: edward-miller-1 from miami fl
16 July 2003

After years of watching films and studying their art for my own pleasure, I’ve decided that some of the most interesting and least appreciated movies are those released under the RKO logo. Born to be Bad is a prime example. Made in 1948-49 (not released until ’50) under the aegis of Howard Hughes while he was alternately pursuing and manipulating Joan Fontaine, this movie has a unique, non -studio look. Very little location work was done, but doesn’t it feel like San Francisco (more than Vertigo!). Literate script, intelligent casting, stylish sets and costumes (New York designer Hattie Carnegie for Fontaine, RKO in-house man Michael Woulfe for Joan Leslie) add up to an engrossing, adult 90 minutes.

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Speaking of adult; there’s been some comments here about the Mel Ferrer character: “Is he or isn’t he gay?” IS THERE ANY DOUBT? And check out one scene, unbelievably adult for 1950 Hollywood: When Fontaine returns home after a torrid sexual encounter with Robert Ryan, she quickly takes a hot bath before husband Zachary Scott returns home. Scent of another man? Pretty hot stuff in retrospect. Check this movie out when you get the opportunity!

How fine acting and direction uplifts a film

8/10
Author: Charles Reichenthal (churei@aol.com) from Brooklyn, New York
3 May 2002

Nicholas Ray’s career remains unique in its peaks and valleys, but his work has never been dull. Even A WOMAN’S SECRET stirs memories, notably from the performance of his then-wife Gloria Grahame. BORN TO BE BAD is an “almost” — its depiction of the New York theatrical lifestyle on on-target, down to the living quarters. And its characters ring true. Still, the plot, if taken apart, is a muddle in the middle. Nonetheless, Ray has provided strong mise en scene, and offered an underrated star like JOAN LESLIE an opportunity to show how truthful and relaxed a performer she was. Her performance is almost equalled by that of MEL FERRER as the “probably-gay” character.

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In her role, JOAN FONTAINE, an excellent actress, is able to convey the seven-faced facets of a woman who misuses friendships, romance, and opportunity… all for her benefit. ROBERT RYAN, as ever, offers a solid performance though his character is far less defined. and ZACHARY SCOTT does well too. Ray’s use of camera angles, lighting, etal. may seem commonplace, but there is careful use of everything involved. But what is remembered, when all is said and done, is the work of JOAN LESLIE as the put-upon fiance. It is performances like hers that are ignored… but that are enormously difficult to bring across accurately. Hers is the pilot light that keeps BORN TO BE BAD intriguing.

More than meets the eye!

Author: fjarlett (fjarlett@fast.net) from Philadelphia, PA
26 April 2002

Most people remember Nicholas Ray for his most famous films, Rebel Without A Cause and Johnny Guitar being the ones most talked about . Born To Be Bad is ensconced in the category reserved for ignored treasures and guilty pleasures, since Director Ray’s characteristic “signature” as a director was just as canny in this film as in any of his lesser discussed works, On Dangerous Ground (which also featured Robert Ryan) being another example.

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This reviewer sees the same sophistication in Born To Be Bad as in another 50s Ray piece, In A Lonely Place; Born To Be Bad is just as cynical in its own way, guised as a superficially lighter “high society” melodrama. Although there are no dark staircases, ominous shadows or oblique camera angles here, Born To Be Bad has subterfuge and alienation at its core in Joan Fontaine’s central character, Christabel Caine. The misery depicted here is the type that afflicts the rich and the venal, where wealth, not poverty, is the variable behind their alienation, and their betrayals are carried out in swank apartments and elite mansions instead of typical “noir” territory. The stylistic dimensions of the film aside, Born To Be Bad also features Robert Ryan and Joan Fontaine together romantically. For Ryan devotees searching for the few romantic roles that came his way, they should certainly see the film: the chemistry between Ryan and Fontaine simmers in furtive trysts that were somewhat risque for cinema of that era (a comparable romance between Ryan and a female lead can also be found in the 1952 “noir” masterpiece, Clash By Night). Still available on laserdisc, Born To Be Bad features a crystal clear video transfer worthy of any film buff.

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Joan Fontaine is the classic lovely manipulator

Author: Old_Abe from Astoria, NY
17 February 2000

If you’ve enjoyed Joan Fontaine’s endearing performances in REBECCA or SUSPICION, check out this movie for an entirely different turn of character.

Joan plays Christabel, a woman with nice curves who’s got all the angles, too. She’s a classic manipulator, and the fun of the movie is watching her try to keep up her false appearances as she runs recklessly through the lives around her — society friends, sick relatives, a thin-mustached rich playboy, and the rugged novelist guy who sees through her and loves her still.

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The performance is one of shifting eyes, deceptive wheels turning inside the lovely Christabel’s head, trying to recall which lie she told to whom. Fontaine retains a sense of mystery about her, because you keep wondering to what end is all this manipulation, anyway — does Christabel even know? A consummate liar, she also remains a bit sympathetic through it all: you get the sense of someone who has played so many contradictory roles that she’s kind of a lost soul.

As for the story itself, it’s pretty good; and the supporting characters are merely okay. But really, they’re just pins set up for Christabel to upset. Sit back and watch her go.

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So, if you’re like me and wanted to reach out and protect Joan in her Hitchcock movies, try BORN TO BE BAD. She’s just as lovely (those doe-eyes will make you want to believe her) — only hold onto your heart, and your wallet.

Sweet young thing wreaks havoc

7/10
Author: blanche-2 from United States
3 February 2006

Joan Fontaine plays a real conniver hiding beneath a soft exterior in “Born to Be Bad,” also starring Robert Ryan, Zachary Scott, Mel Ferrer, and Joan Leslie. Fontaine is Christabel, a young woman from the poor side of the family who comes to town to work for her Uncle John once his assistant (Leslie) has married a wealthy, eligible bachelor Curtis (Scott). Fontaine sets her sights on the big money right away but finds herself in the heavy clinches with an author (Ryan) who’s in love with her. She’s reminiscent in her way of a non-show biz Eve Harrington.

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Using her soft voice and all that gossamer femininity, Christabel manages, with an innuendo here, an innuendo there, a suggestion here, a hint there – to totally break up the engaged couple and drive Joan Leslie right out of town. Since Christabel has dropped out of business school, her uncle says she can’t work for him and needs to return home. In a panic, she throws herself at Curtis at a ball and wins him. The question then is, what did she win? What did he lose? This potboiler was directed by Nicholas Ray, and I have to believe the man had a sense of humor. Otherwise, how do you account for those love scenes? Every time a man went to kiss Fontaine, he swept her around and dipped her, nearly breaking her neck as the music crescendos. Then there were the shots of Joan, her face in a state of rapture, as she realized she was getting what she wanted. Very campy.

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Joan Fontaine is excellent in the role, very sweet in the beginning but becoming austere after she marries Curtis. It’s a subtle change but definitely demonstrates her acting ability. She looks lovely in a variety of gowns and dresses. Robert Ryan is extremely handsome in this, as well as charming, funny, and a real catch. His character sees right through Christabel but wants her anyway. The acting is uniformly good. Mel Ferrer plays an artist who also has Christabel’s number and paints her portrait.

“Born to Be Bad” is fun to watch though it’s certainly not Ray’s best work. I do think one has to allow for the fact that he saw this as a real potboiler and directed it the way he did on purpose. If you can’t beat ’em – and with this script, how could he – join ’em.

By the way, there’s a mistake in the letter that Christabel leaves for Curtis.

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